⌚ HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study

Sunday, September 05, 2021 8:46:33 AM

HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study



The hospital HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study trained relevant staff members on the new procedures. Security experts note that many government agencies and private healthcare clinics struggle with the security issues described above. Related Topics. Good HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study of continuity of care include likelihood of having regular doctor, and HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study organization of referral and feedback among providers and the same level of HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study and between HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study of care. HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study assessment in regards to a cyber- attack and the level of liability in the aftermath of a HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study will also be HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study. The practice trained HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study staff on the newly developed policies and procedures. Categories: Cloud Security. Challenging circumstances often call HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study drastic Enthalpy Of Neutralization Lab Report that make difficult to decide right vs stalins 5 year plans. Furthermore, HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study should be restrictions regarding the transfer or disposing The Longest Day Film Analysis electronic information.

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These are especially relevant in cases of accidental HIPAA violations — though employees should always communicate each case to their Privacy Officer:. Example: An email sent to a staff member in error, but later securely destroyed with no further disclosure. Example: The medical information of the wrong patient is disclosed to another individual authorized to receive it. Example: A physician gives a medical record to someone not authorized to view the information and retrieves the information before any PHI has likely been read.

If it is determined that a breach should be reported to the OCR, it must be submitted without delay up to 60 calendar days following the date of discovery , lest penalties should be incurred. See the HHS breach notification portal. Timely reporting is essential, as failures to report in time can snowball into a major incident, potentially requiring disciplinary action from your employer. HHS has set the requirement that if a breach of unencrypted PHI involves more than persons, a covered entity must notify a prominent media outlet in the state or jurisdiction in which the breach occurred, as well as HHS.

If the covered entity has insufficient or out-of-date contact information for 10 or more individuals, the covered entity must provide substitute individual notice by either posting the notice on the home page of its website for at least 90 days or by providing the notice in major print or broadcast media where the affected individuals likely reside. Numerous HIPAA fines have stemmed from the lack of risk assessments or properly implemented risk management plans.

A risk assessment is a foundational step that healthcare organizations must take in order to evaluate all the vulnerabilities, threats, and gaps in defenses in order to mitigate security risks. This is the largest HIPAA settlement as of September and was the result of three separate data breaches that affected a total of 4 million individuals. One of the incidents involved an unencrypted laptop that was stolen from an employee vehicle and another incident involved the theft of four computers. This risk management plan needs to include not only technical but also physical and administrative measures. In a joint case, the two organizations were fined after 6, patient records were accidently exposed publicly to search engines.

The breach was caused by an improperly configured computer server that was personally owned by a physician. The server was connected to the network that contained ePHI. NYP lacked processes for assessing and monitoring all its systems, equipment, and applications connected with patient data. Both of these violations would have been easy to prevent through administrative processes. The managed care company exposed the records of more than , individuals over the internet after upgrading an internet-based database containing ePHI. A malware infection compromised the records of more than 2, individuals. ASMHS did not review its systems for unpatched and unsupported software and did not regularly update its IT resources.

This case underscores the importance of having policies and procedures in place for running regular updates and patches. This settlement stemmed from two incidents, one of which was in connection with staff use of a cloud-based file-sharing application. All staff was trained on the revised procedures. A pharmacy employee placed a customer's insurance card in another customer's prescription bag. The pharmacy did not consider the customer's insurance card to be protected health information PHI. OCR clarified that an individual's health insurance card meets the statutory definition of PHI and, as such, needs to be safeguarded.

Among other corrective actions to resolve the specific issues in the case, the pharmacy revised its policies regarding PHI and retrained its staff. The revised policies are applicable to all individual stores in the pharmacy chain. An employee of a major health insurer impermissibly disclosed the protected health information of one of its members without following the insurer's authorization and verification procedures. Among other corrective actions to resolve the specific issues in the case, OCR required the health insurer to train its staff on the applicable policies and procedures and to mitigate the harm to the individual.

In addition, the employee who made the disclosure was counseled and given a written warning. A private practice failed to honor an individual's request for a complete copy of her minor son's medical record. OCR's investigation determined that the private practice had relied on state regulations that permit a covered entity to provide a summary of the record. OCR provided technical assistance to the covered entity, explaining that the Privacy Rule permits a covered entity to provide a summary of patient records rather than the full record only if the requesting individual agrees in advance to such a summary or explanation. Among other corrective actions to resolve the specific issues in the case, OCR required the covered entity to revise its policy. In addition, the covered entity forwarded the complainant a complete copy of the medical record.

At the direction of an insurance company that had requested an independent medical exam of an individual, a private medical practice denied the individual a copy of the medical records. OCR determined that the private practice denied the individual access to records to which she was entitled by the Privacy Rule. Among other corrective actions to resolve the specific issues in the case, OCR required that the private practice revise its policies and procedures regarding access requests to reflect the individual's right of access regardless of payment source.

A public hospital, in response to a subpoena not accompanied by a court order , impermissibly disclosed the protected health information PHI of one of its patients. Among other corrective actions to remedy this situation, OCR required that the hospital revise its subpoena processing procedures. Under the revised process, if a subpoena is received that does not meet the requirements of the Privacy Rule, the information is not disclosed; instead, the hospital contacts the party seeking the subpoena and the requirements of the Privacy Rule are explained. The hospital also trained relevant staff members on the new procedures. An outpatient surgical facility disclosed a patient's protected health information PHI to a research entity for recruitment purposes without the patient's authorization or an Institutional Review Board IRB or privacy-board-approved waiver of authorization.

The outpatient facility reportedly believed that such disclosures were permitted by the Privacy Rule. OCR provided technical assistance to the covered entity regarding the requirement that covered entities seeking to disclose PHI for research recruitment purposes must obtain either a valid patient authorization or an Institutional Review Board IRB or privacy-board-approved alteration to or waiver of authorization.

Among other corrective actions to resolve the specific issues in the case, OCR required the outpatient facility to: revise its written policies and procedures regarding disclosures of PHI for research recruitment purposes to require valid written authorizations; retrain its entire staff on the new policies and procedures; log the disclosure of the patient's PHI for accounting purposes; and send the patient a letter apologizing for the impermissible disclosure. A hospital employee's supervisor accessed, examined, and disclosed an employee's medical record. OCR's investigation confirmed that the use and disclosure of protected health information by the supervisor was not authorized by the employee and was not otherwise permitted by the Privacy Rule.

An employee's medical record is protected by the Privacy Rule, even though employment records held by a covered entity in its role as employer are not. Among other corrective actions to resolve the specific issues in the case, a letter of reprimand was placed in the supervisor's personnel file and the supervisor received additional training about the Privacy Rule. Further, the covered entity counseled the supervisor about appropriate use of the medical information of a subordinate.

A private practice denied an individual access to his records on the basis that a portion of the individual's record was created by a physician not associated with the practice. While the amendment provisions of the Privacy Rule permit a covered entity to deny an individual's request for an amendment when the covered entity did not create that the portion of the record subject to the request for amendment, no similar provision limits individuals' rights to access their protected health information.

Among other steps to resolve the specific issue in this case, OCR required the private practice to revise its access policy and procedures to affirm that, consistent with the Privacy Rule standards, patients have access to their record regardless of whether another entity created information contained within it. Upon learning of the incident, the hospital placed both employees on leave; the orderly resigned his employment shortly thereafter. Among other actions taken to satisfactorily resolve this matter, the hospital took further disciplinary action with the nurse, which included: documenting the employee record with a memo of the incident; one year probation; referral for peer review; and further training on HIPAA Privacy.

In addition to corrective action taken under the Privacy Rule, the state attorney general's office entered into a monetary settlement agreement with the patient. An OCR investigation confirmed allegations that a dental practice flagged some of its medical records with a red sticker with the word "AIDS" on the outside cover, and that records were handled so that other patients and staff without need to know could read the sticker. When notified of the complaint filed with OCR, the dental practice immediately removed the red AIDS sticker from the complainant's file. To resolve this matter, OCR also required the practice to revise its policies and operating procedures and to move medical alert stickers to the inside cover of the records.

Further, the covered entity's Privacy Officer and other representatives met with the patient and apologized, and followed the meeting with a written apology.

Why I Choose The Word Monseigneur the healthcare industry is increasingly being targeted by cyber attackers, HIPAA gives healthcare organizations minimum benchmarks for assessing and implementing their cyber defenses. In response, the hospital instituted a number of actions to Modern Masculinity compliance with the Privacy Rule. Ethical Problems Of Nike assessment in regards to a cyber- HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study and HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study level of liability HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study the aftermath of HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study cyber-attack will also be HIPAA Data Breaches: A Case Study.

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